Orchid Photos - page 5

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1 - Helleborines (Epidendroidae)
2 - Helleborines (Epipactis)
3 - Fen and Downland Orchids
4 - Grassland Orchids
5 - Marsh Orchids (Dactylorhiza)
6 - Grassland Orchids II
7 - Ophrys and Cypripedium

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Marsh Orchids

Early Marsh Orchid Early Marsh Orchid  There's a lot of disagreement over how to classify the Genus Dactylorhiza (marsh orchids) as the many variants are difficult to identify. The Early Marsh Orchid (Dactylorhiza incarnata) is a particularly attractive plant, with pale pink flowers, seen here at Dry Sandford Pit in Oxfordshire. The flower sepals are held aloft like donkeys ears.

May 2005

Nikon D70 with Tamron 90mm macro lens, 1/60 sec, f/6.7

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Early Marsh Orchid 
Frog Orchid Frog Orchid  The Frog Orchid (Dactylorhiza viridis) is small and often inconspicuous amongst other grassland plants. There is no obvious resemblance to a frog! I saw this plant on Milk Hill, near Devizes in Wiltshire.

July 1998

Pentax K1000 with Tamron 90mm macro lens

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Frog Orchid 
Common Spotted Orchid Common Spotted Orchid  The Common Spotted Orchid (Dactylorhiza fuchsii) with its deeply divided three-lobed lip to the flower, is the most widespread and common of all the British Orchids. The colour of the flowers can vary from dark purple to white. The English name is derived from the leaves at the base of the stem, which are usually covered in brownish-purple spots. These plants were near the Ridgeway, on the Berkshire Downs.

June 2003

Pentax MZ5n with Tamron 90mm macro lens

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Common Spotted Orchid 
Heath Spotted Orchid Heath Spotted Orchid  The white-flowered form of the Heath Spotted Orchid (Dactylorhiza maculata) is rare. I found this example near Webbers Post on Exmoor. It is very closely related to the Common Spotted Orchid, with similar spotted leaves but with a broad lip to the flower. It favours acid heathland rather than chalk and limestone.

June 1993

Pentax K1000 with Tamron 90mm macro lens

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Heath Spotted Orchid 
Southern Marsh Orchid Southern Marsh Orchid  The Southern Marsh Orchid (Dactylorhiza praetermissa) is locally common and widspread. It can be a large robust and 'showy' plant as in these examples at Didcot in Oxfordshire. The flower markings tend to be concentrated in the centre of the wide lip.

July 2007

Nikon D70 with 18-70 lens
1/60s, f/8

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Southern Marsh Orchid 
Pugsley's Marsh Orchid Pugsley's Marsh Orchid  The Pugsley's Marsh Orchid is the scarcest and most localised of the marsh orchids. I photographed these plants at Cothill Fen in Oxfordshire. The close up shows the characteristic lop-sided flower spike, bearing flowers with a wide lip and central 'tooth'. Recent DNA evidence suggests that this population, previously classed as D.traunsteinerioides, has molecular features more in common with D.praetermissa. A recent paper, Bateman & Denholm (2012), proposed the name Dactylorhiza praetermissa ssp. schoenophila.

June 2011

Nikon D300s with Tamron 90mm macro lens, 1/350 sec, f/9.5

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Pugsley's Marsh Orchid 
 Northern Marsh Orchid Northern Marsh Orchid The Northern Marsh Orchid (Dactylorhiza purpurella), as its name implies, has a northerly distribution.  Unlike its Southern counterpart, it tends to have  a shorter, stout stem with a flat-topped flower spike.  The lip has a straight-sided diamond shape without separate lobes. I photographed these plants at the Gait Barrows NNR in Lancashire

 

 June 2016

 

Olympus OM-D E-M1 with 12-50mm macro lens 1/250s, f/10

 

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Northern Marsh Orchid
All text and photographs on this website are Copyright Mike Flemming.

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