Orchid Photos - page 4

Return to Orchids Home

go to page:

1 - Helleborines (Epidendroidae)
2 - Helleborines (Epipactis)
3 - Fen and Downland Orchids
4 - Grassland Orchids
5 - Marsh Orchids (Dactylorhiza)
6 - Grassland Orchids II
7 - Ophrys and Cypripedium

<<back | next>>

Grassland Orchids

Early Purple Orchid  Early Purple Orchid  The Early Purple Orchid (Orchis mascula) is the first to flower in the season and one of the commonest and most widespread British orchids. It appears with other Spring flowers, such as Bluebell and Cowslip. The flower spike is fairly open and the leaves may be either spotted or unspotted. I photographed these examples in the BBOWT reserve at Moor Copse, near Reading.

April 2006

Nikon D70 with Tamron 90mm macro lens, 1/90 sec, f/9.5

 

 

Go to Top

Early Purple Orchid 
Lesser Butterfly Orchid Lesser Butterfly Orchid  The Lesser Butterfly Orchid (Platanthera bifolia) is scarcer than its larger relative (below) and has a similar 'open' flower spike. In this species, the two pollinia inside the flower are placed close together and parallel to one another, as shown in the detail photo. I took these photographs, which include a pair of 'real' butterflies, on the Strawberry Banks reserve in Gloucestershire

May 2015

Olympus E-M5 with 12-50mm lens,  1/320s@f/7.1 ISO 400

 

 

Go to Top

Lesser Butterfly Orchid 
Greater Butterfly Orchid Greater Butterfly Orchid  The Greater Butterfly Orchid (Platanthera chlorantha), with its loose, open spike of greenish-white flowers, is widely distributed in Southern England. The detail photo shows the widely spaced pollinia, leaning inwards towards the top. My larger photos show the long spurs on the individual flowers. These plants were at Park Gate Down in Kent.

May 2004

Canon Powershot A20, 1/320s, f/6.9

 

 

Go to Top

Greater Butterfly Orchid 
Common Fragrant Orchid Common Fragrant Orchid  The Common Fragrant Orchid (Gymnadenia conopsea) is found on chalk and limestone soils throughout England and Wales. The sickly-sweet fragrance is strongest in the evening. I photographed these plants at the BBOWT Sydlings Copse Reserve near Oxford.

June 2005

Nikon D70 with Tamron 90mm macro lens, 1/90 sec, f/9.5

 

 

Go to Top

Common Fragrant Orchid 
Marsh Fragrant Orchid Marsh Fragrant Orchid  Recent DNA analysis has shown that the Marsh Fragrant Orchid (Gymnadenia densiflora) merits status as a full species. Because of this recent separation from other Fragrant Orchids, its distribution is still uncertain but I found this plant, in company with Marsh Helleborines, in calcareous fen at Dry Sandford Pit in Oxfordshire. The Cumbria Wildlife website provides a useful guide to separating the three 'Fragrant' species.

July 2009

Nikon D70 with Tamron 90mm macro lens, 1/500s, f/8

 

 

Go to Top

Marsh Fragrant Orchid 
All text and photographs on this website are Copyright Mike Flemming.

<<back | next>>