Orchid Photos - page 3

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1 - Helleborines (Epidendroidae)
2 - Helleborines (Epipactis)
3 - Fen and Downland Orchids
4 - Grassland Orchids
5 - Marsh Orchids (Dactylorhiza)
6 - Grassland Orchids II
7 - Ophrys and Cypripedium

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Fen and Downland Orchids

Fen Orchid Fen Orchid  The Fen Orchid (Liparis loeselii) is highly unlikely to be found by chance. This small, inconspicuous plant is a specialist of calcareous, moist ground, which it colonises before other competing vegetation develops. The flowers are green-yellow, with two thread-like petals, curved down and forwards, in the direction of the lip. I photographed these plants at their Welsh site on Kenfig NNR.

July 2013

Panasonic Lumix TZ25, 1/200s @ f/4 ISO 100

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Fen Orchid 
Bog Orchid  Bog Orchid  As its name implies, finding the Bog Orchid (Hammarbya paludosa) is likely to involve getting your feet wet! This is Britain's smallest Orchid and can be very difficult to spot amongst surrounding vegetation. In England, it occurs in several New Forest bogs, where I found these examples on the Western edge of Long Beech Inclosure.

July 2014

Panasonic Lumix FZ200, 1/400s @ f/4 ISO 160

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Bog Orchid 
Autumn Lady's Tresses Autumn Lady's Tresses The Autumn Lady's-Tresses (Spiranthes spiralis) is the last British Native Orchid to flower in the season. It favours short, dry turf, especially chalk downland as at Noar Hill in Hampshire, where I photographed these plants. The small white flowers are arranged in a spiral around the stem.

August 2004

Nikon D70 with Tamron 90mm macro lens, 1/350 sec, f/9.5

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Autumn Lady's Tresses 
Musk Orchid  Musk Orchid 

The Musk Orchid (Herminium monorchis) is a truly tiny plant that barely rises out of the grass in its typical chalk downland habitat. It is 'Nationally Scarce' and has disappeared from many old sites. I saw these plants at Noar Hill in Hampshire.

June 2008

Nikon D70 with Tamron 90mm macro lens, 1/350 sec, f/13

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Musk Orchid 
Man Orchid  Man Orchid  From a distance, the Man Orchid (Orchis anthropophora) is inconspicuous and superficially similar to the Common Twayblade. Closer inspection reveals the tiny anthropomorphic figure with its cowled head. These plants were at Queendown Warren in Kent.

May 2004

Canon Powershot A20, 1/160s, f/4.3

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Man Orchid 
Monkey Orchid Monkey Orchid  The Monkey Orchid (Orchis simia) is one of Britain's rarest orchids with sites in the Chilterns and Kent. The downland site shown in the main photo is at Park Gate Down in Kent. The inflorescence has a tousle-headed appearance as, unusually, the flowers at the top of the spike open first.

May 2004

Canon Powershot A20, 1/125 sec, f/8

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Monkey Orchid
Military Orchid Military Orchid  The Military Orchid (Orchis militaris) is very rare in Britain, with a flower that is similar to the Monkey Orchid but with a 'soldier's helmet' and row of buttons down the 'tunic'. It is usually a robust plant wth a large flower spike. Genetic research has indicated that the three British populations, in Suffolk and Oxfordshire, may represent separate colonisations from Europe. My photographs are from one of the Oxfordshire sites.

May 2008

Nikon D70 with Tamron 90mm macro lens, 1/350 sec, f/9.5

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Military Orchid 
Lady Orchid Lady Orchid  The Lady Orchid (Orchis purpurea) is most frequently found on the North Downs in Kent but I took thiese photographs at the BBOWT Reserve at Hartslock in Oxfordshire. The plants at this site have hybridised with Monkey Orchids, as described under Lady/Monkey Hybrids.

May 2009

Nikon D70 with 70-300VR lens, 1/60 sec, f/9.5

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Lady Orchid 
All text and photographs on this website are Copyright Mike Flemming.

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