Orchid Photos - Page 1

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39 species of British Orchids are illustrated on the seven pages of this section of my website. The pages are grouped as follows:

1 - Helleborines (Epidendroidae)
2 - Helleborines (Epipactis)
3 - Fen and Downland Orchids
4 - Grassland Orchids
5 - Marsh Orchids (Dactylorhiza)
6 - Grassland Orchids II
7 - Ophrys and Cypripedium

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Helleborines (Epidendroidae)

Red Helleborine Red Helleborine  If rarity and beauty are your criteria, then the Red Helleborine (Cephelanthera rubra) must be top of the list! There are only three known sites in England - I photographed these examples at the Chilterns site. The flowers are a true pink, rather than the purplish hue of so many British orchids, and are carried in an open spike above long, narrow leaves.

June 2002

Pentax MZ5n with Tamron 90mm macro lens

 

 

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Red Helleborine 
Sword-leaved Helleborine Sword-leaved Helleborine  The Sword-Leaved Helleborine (Cephalanthera longifolia) is now limited to a very few sites in Britain. The striking spires of pure white flowers rise above the long leaves, alternating up the stem. I photographed these plants at Chappett's Copse in Hampshire.

May 2009

Nikon D70 with Tamron 90mm macro lens, 1/90s at f/5.6

 

 

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Sword-leaved Helleborine 

White Helleborine

White Helleborine  The White Helleborine (Cephalanthera damasonium) is similar to the Sword-Leaved (above), though the leaves are much broader, and is relatively common in beechwoods in Southern England. The flowers are creamy-white and rarely open fully. These plants were at the Berks, Bucks, and Oxon Wildlife Trust (BBOWT) reserve at Homefield Wood

June 1993

Pentax K1000 with Tamron 90mm macro lens

 

 

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White Helleborine 

 Common Twayblade

Common Twayblade The Common Twayblade (Neottia ovata) is one of the commonest British Orchids but the thin spires of green flowers can be hard to spot. The name derives from the two large oval leaves opposite each other, from which the stem emerges, initially with a tightly-packed spike. I photographed these plants at Rodborough Common in Gloucestershire.

May 2015

Olympus E-M5 with 12-50mm lens, 1/250s@f/7.1 ISO400

 

 

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Common Twayblade

rBirdsnest Orchid

Birdsnest Orchid  The Bird's-Nest Orchid (Neottia nidus-avis) is no beauty and emerges from the leaf litter in the heavy shade of a Southern beechwood. It is totally dependent on a fungal partner and has no chlorophyll. The typical orchid form of the honey brown flowers can be seen in a close up view. I photographed this specimen at Homefield Wood.

May 2008

(main photo) Nikon D70 with 18-70mm lens (at 34mm), 1/15s, f/4.8

 

 

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Birdsnest Orchid 
All text and photographs on this website are Copyright Mike Flemming.

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